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Found 4 results

  1. Register for the Webcast at: http://www.prismtech.com/events/art-and-science-dds-data-modeling-webcast Why Attend: * Understand the role and scope of Data Modeling in DDS * Learn the key techniques for effective and extensible Data Models Design * Learn about the most common DDS Data Modeling Idioms Abstract The Data Distribution Service (DDS) is a standard for ubiquitous, interoperable, secure, platform independent, and real-time data sharing across network connected devices. DDS is today used and recommended in a large class of application domains, such as Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Defense and Aerospace, Transportation, Robotics, Energy, and Medical. Differently from traditional message-centric technologies, DDS is data-centric – the accent is on seamless (user-defined) data sharing as opposed to message delivery. Therefore, when embracing DDS and data-centricity, data modeling becomes a key step in the design of a distributed system. This webcast will (1) explain the role and scope of data modeling in DDS, (2) introduce the techniques at the foundation of effective and extensible Data Models, and (3) summarize the most common DDS Data Modeling Idioms. Webcast Presenter: Angelo Corsaro, Ph.D. is Chief Technology Officer (CTO) at ADLINK Technology Inc. As CTO he looks after technology strategy and innovation for ADLINK’s Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) Platform. Angelo also serves as PrismTech (an ADLINK company) CTO, where he looks after technology strategy and innovation for PrismTech's Vortex IIoT data sharing platform. Angelo leads the strategic standardization at the Object Management Group (OMG), where he co-chairs the Data Distribution Service (DDS) Special Interest Group. Before joining PrismTech, Angelo was working as a Scientist at the SELEX-SI and FINMECCANICA Technology Directorate. There, he was responsible for the corporate middleware strategy, for strategic standardization, and R&D collaborations with top Universities. Angelo is a well-known and cited expert in the area of high performance and large scale distributed systems with 100s of publications for referred journal, conferences, workshops, and magazines. Angelo received a Ph.D. and a M.S. in Computer Science from the Washington University in St. Louis, and a Laurea Magna cum Laude in Computer Engineering from the University of Catania, Italy.
  2. Register for the webcast at: http://www.prismtech.com/webcast-signup Why Attend: * Understand the common challenges posed by Distributed Systems and the traps and pitfalls that you should avoid * Learn about canonical coordination models for distributed systems * Learn about the key distributed algorithms that can be used to solve common problems, such as fault-detection, group management, distributed mutex and barriers, etc., when architecting distributed systems * Discover how these algorithms can be efficiently implemented in Data Distribution Service (DDS) Abstract: Designing distributed systems is hard and one of the main aims of DDS is to make this task less daunting. Yet, to exploit DDS's full potential it is key to understand the coordination model and architectural style it promotes along with the key properties that it guarantees. Only after having understood these concepts will you realize the full power of DDS. This webcast, after summarizing the main challenges that architects face when designing distributed systems will (1) introduce a series of canonical coordination models, (2) explain DDS's coordination model and its powerful properties, (3) identify the key patterns that underlie the coordination model (4) show how this coordination model can be used to build some interesting distributed applications and some key distributed algorithms. The webcast will last approximately one hour. Webcast Presenter: Angelo Corsaro, Ph.D. is Chief Technology Officer (CTO) at ADLINK Technology Inc. As CTO he looks after technology strategy and innovation for ADLINK’s Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) Platform. Angelo also serves as PrismTech (an ADLINK company) CTO, where he looks after technology strategy and innovation for PrismTech's Vortex IIoT data sharing platform. Angelo leads the strategic standardization at the Object Management Group (OMG), where he co-chairs the Data Distribution Service (DDS) Special Interest Group. Before joining PrismTech, Angelo was working as a Scientist at the SELEX-SI and FINMECCANICA Technology Directorate. There, he was responsible for the corporate middleware strategy, for strategic standardization, and R&D collaborations with top Universities. Angelo is a well-known and cited expert in the area of high performance and large scale distributed systems with 100s of publications for referred journal, conferences, workshops, and magazines. Angelo received a Ph.D. and a M.S. in Computer Science from the Washington University in St. Louis, and a Laurea Magna cum Laude in Computer Engineering from the University of Catania, Italy.
  3. Distributed Algorithms in DDS: Higher Level Abstractions for Building Scalable and Fault-Tolerant Distributed Systems Webcast Register at: http://www.prismtech.com/events/distributed-algorithms-dds-higher-level-abstractions-building-scalable-and-fault-tolerant Why Attend: * Understand the common challenges posed by Distributed Systems and the traps and pitfalls that you should avoid. * Learn about the key distributed algorithms that can be used to solve common problems, such as fault-detection, group management, distributed mutex and barriers, etc., when architecting distributed systems. * Discover how these algorithms can be efficiently implemented in DDS. Abstract: The OMG Data Distribution Service (DDS) standard has recently received an incredible level of attention and press coverage due to its relevance for Consumer and Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) applications and its suitability for the Industrial Internet Consortium’s Reference Architecture. The main reason for the excitement in DDS stems from its data-centricity, efficiency, internet-wide scalability, high-availability and configurability. Although DDS provides a very feature rich platform for architecting distributed systems, it focuses on doing one thing well — namely data-sharing. As a result, many architects and developers tend to devise by themselves – assuming the DDS primitives as a foundation – the (hopefully correct) algorithms for distributed systems such as fault-detection, distributed mutual exclusion, distributed barriers, leader election, consensus, atomic multicast, distributed queues, etc. This webcast explores DDS-based distributed algorithms for many classical, yet fundamental, problems in distributed systems. By attending the webcast you will learn how recurring problems arising in the design of distributed systems can be addressed using algorithms that are correct and perform well. The webcast will last approximately one hour. Webcast Presenter: Angelo Corsaro, Ph.D. is Chief Technology Officer (CTO) at PrismTech where he directs the technology strategy, planning, evolution, and evangelism. Angelo leads the strategic standardization at the Object Management Group (OMG), where he co-chairs the Data Distribution Service (DDS) Special Interest Group and serves on the Architecture Board. Angelo is a widely known and cited expert in the field of real-time and distributed systems, middleware, and software patterns, has authored several international standards and enjoys over 10+ years of experience in technology management and design of high performance mission- and business-critical distributed systems. Angelo received a Ph.D. and a M.S. in Computer Science from the Washington University in St. Louis, and a Laurea Magna cum Laude in Computer Engineering from the University of Catania, Italy.
  4. Hello ! My distributed environment is constituted by 2 machines (node 1 and node 2), all the QoS are TRANSIENT_DURABILITY_QOS. Case 1 : 1/ Node 1 : starts OSPL 2/ Node 2 : starts OSPL 3/ Node 1 : The process 1 data-write a sample on the data D (identified by its topic and key) 4/ Node 1 : The process 2 data-write a sample on the data D (same topic and key) 5/ Node 1 : The process 2 destroy its datawriter 6/ Node 2 : A process try to lookup instance of the data D => found ! Ok, the instance is found on node 2 because process 1 of node 1 did not destroy its datawriter (there is still one datawriter registering the instance) Case 2 (same as case 1 but node 2 starts OSPL later) : 1/ Node 1 : starts OSPL 2/ Node 1 : The process 1 data-write a sample on the data D (identified by its topic and key) 3/ Node 1 : The process 2 data-write a sample on the data D (same topic and key) 4/ Node 1 : The process 2 destroy its datawriter 5/ Node 2 : starts OSPL 6/ Node 2 : A process try to lookup instance of the data D => not found ! Why since one datawriter is still registering the instance ? I would like the instance of the data D be found on each case. Have I a problem in the DDS aligment processus ? Can you help me ? Thank you ! Complement of information : At the step 5 of the case 2, I saw the following trace in the log of durability of the node 2 : 8.316936370 FETCH_INITIAL (sampleChainListener) -> Injected: TOTAL: 6, WRITE: 2, DISPOSE: 2, WRITE_DISPOSE: 0, REGISTER: 0, UNREGISTER: 2. On the other hand, if I omit the step 4 of the case 2 (no deletion of the datawriter), the instance of the data D is found and the trace is : 9.254600794 FETCH_INITIAL (sampleChainListener) -> Injected: TOTAL: 2, WRITE: 2, DISPOSE: 0, WRITE_DISPOSE: 0, REGISTER: 0, UNREGISTER: 0. My OSPL.XML : <OpenSplice> <Domain> <Name>NEXEYA</Name> <Database> <Size>209715200</Size> </Database> <Lease> <ExpiryTime update_factor="0.2">5.0</ExpiryTime> </Lease> <Service name="networking"> <Command>networking.exe</Command> </Service> <Service name="durability"> <Command>durability.exe</Command> </Service> </Domain> <NetworkService name="networking"> <Tracing> <Categories> <Default>1</Default> </Categories> <OutputFile>networking.log</OutputFile> <Timestamps>true</Timestamps> </Tracing> <Partitioning> <GlobalPartition Address="192.168.1.8"/></Partitioning> <Channels> <Channel default="true" enabled="true" name="BestEffort" reliable="false"> <PortNr>53370</PortNr> <Resolution>1</Resolution> <FragmentSize>65535</FragmentSize> </Channel> <Channel enabled="true" name="Reliable" reliable="true"> <PortNr>53380</PortNr> <Resolution>1</Resolution> <FragmentSize>65535</FragmentSize> </Channel> </Channels> <Discovery enabled="true"> <PortNr>53390</PortNr> </Discovery> <General> <NetworkInterfaceAddress forced="true">192.168.1.10</NetworkInterfaceAddress> <Reconnection allowed="false"/></General> </NetworkService> <DurabilityService name="durability"> <Tracing> <Verbosity>FINEST</Verbosity> <OutputFile>durability.log</OutputFile> <Timestamps absolute="false">true</Timestamps> </Tracing> <Network> <InitialDiscoveryPeriod>2.0</InitialDiscoveryPeriod> <Alignment> <TimeAlignment>FALSE</TimeAlignment> <RequestCombinePeriod> <Initial>2.5</Initial> <Operational>0.1</Operational> </RequestCombinePeriod> </Alignment> <WaitForAttachment maxWaitCount="10"> <ServiceName>networking</ServiceName> </WaitForAttachment> </Network> <NameSpaces> <NameSpace name="defaultNamespace"> <Partition>*</Partition> </NameSpace> <Policy alignee="Initial" aligner="True" durability="Durable" nameSpace="defaultNamespace"/></NameSpaces> </DurabilityService> </OpenSplice>
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